Vaccines for children: ages and different vaccinations in children

This article provides an overview of vaccinations in children and infants and addresses some of the controversial vaccinations.

Missed Vaccinations in Children

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The recommended ages for vaccinations should not be understood as final or inevitable, for example, two months can mean a period of 6 to 10 weeks. Despite the need for parents to adhere to the vaccination schedule for their children, the slight delay does not affect the final immunity that children need and does not require children to start again with the series of injections from the beginning, but rotavirus may be an exception if this vaccine is not started for the child Before the age of 12 weeks, experts advise against giving this vaccine at all.

Vaccines should not be postponed if the infant has a mild fever due to a mild infection, such as the common cold.
Recent studies have found that vaccinations in children have “significantly decreased” and there are million children missed basic vaccines after the pandemic in the United States in 2020.

Doctors recommend some vaccines only under special circumstances.
More than one vaccine can be given during one visit to the doctor’s office, but a combination of vaccines is often given in one injection, for example, there is a combination of pertussis, diphtheria, tetanus, polio, and Haemophilus Influenza vaccines in one injection. Combination vaccines reduce the number of injections children need and do not reduce the safety or effectiveness of the vaccine.


It is important to stick to the recommended vaccination schedule because it helps protect infants and children from preventable infections. The table below is based on the recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (see Immunization Schedules for Infants and Children). The table indicates which vaccines are required, at what age they should be given, and the number of doses (indicated by the numbers under the symbols).


There is a range of acceptable ages for many vaccinations. Your pediatrician can make specific recommendations that may vary based on your child’s known health conditions and other conditions. Often, a combination of vaccines is used, so that children take fewer injections.

If children are not vaccinated according to the vaccination schedule, doctors recommend catch-up vaccinations in children, and parents should see a doctor or health clinic to find out how childhood vaccinations are used. Parents should inform the doctor of any side effects that occur after vaccinations.
For more information about this schedule, parents should see a doctor or visit the National Immunization Program website at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Common Vaccinations in Children

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Hepatitis B vaccine for infants and children

This vaccine is given to all newborns before they are discharged from the hospital. The second dose is given at 1 to 2 months of age, followed by the third dose at 6 to 18 months of age.

Rotavirus vaccine in children

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Depending on the vaccine used, 2 or 3 doses of the vaccine are given:
Age of 2 months, 4 months, and 6 months or at 2 months and 4 months old.

Haemophilus Influenza type b vaccine

Depending on the vaccine used, 2 or 3 doses of the vaccine are given:
Age of 2 months, 4 months, and 6 months or at 2 months and 4 months old. These doses are followed by a booster dose given to young children 12 to 15 months of age.

Polio vaccine:

Four doses of polio vaccine are given: at 2 months and 4 months, 6 to 18 months, and 4 to 6 years old.

Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccinations in children

Before age 11, children are given diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) preparation.
Five doses of DTaP are given at 2 months, 4 months, and 6 months of age, 15 to 18 months, and 4 to 6 years of age.
Doctors recommend giving teens tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) product at ages 11 to 12.

Pneumococcal disease vaccine

Four doses of the vaccine are given: at 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and 12 to 15 months.

Meningococcal vaccine

A single dose is given at 11 to 12 years of age, with a booster dose at 16 years of age.

Influenza vaccine

Influenza vaccine should be given annually to everyone, starting at the age of 6 months. Children ages 6 months to 8 years old should be given at least two doses four weeks apart if they are getting the flu vaccine for the first time.

Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine

Two doses are given: at ages 12 to 15 months and 4 to 6 years.

Varicella vaccine

2 doses are given: at ages 12 to 15 months and also in ages 4 to 6 years.

Hepatitis A vaccine

Continuous prophylaxis requires two doses of the hepatitis A vaccine. The first dose is given at ages 12 to 23 months, and the second dose is given after 6 to 18 months. If children over 23 months of age have not been vaccinated, they can be given the hepatitis A vaccine to protect them from this infection.

HPV vaccine

The HPV vaccine is given to adolescents (girls and boys) in 3 doses. The second dose is given one to two months after the first dose, and the third dose is given 4 months later.


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